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an opportunity before we turn to our witnesses. the debate over stand your ground laws raises fundamental questions about self-defense in the be united states of america. in recent years we've seen a dramatic increase in laws expanding the situation in which a person can legally use deadly force in response to a perceived threat. florida passed the first of this new wave of stand your ground laws in 2005. prior to 2005, florida law held that a person outside his home could not use deadly force and then claim self-defense if the person could have safely avoided the confrontation. this, quote, duty of safe retreat, closed quote, sought to prevent public disputes from escalating into violence. but the gun lobby pushed to change florida's law so people could shoot someone who threatened them without first trying to avoid a confrontation. florida wasn't the first state to adopt the stand your ground principle, but florida's 2005 law expanded the principle in several dramatic new ways. first, the law grants criminal and civil of immunity for use withs of deadly force -- for uses of deadly force
received overwhelming number of stories from my constituents with concerns about the health care law. >> 23,000 are losing access to the state sponsored program which covered those with preexisting conditions, seniors and small children and small businesses. one small business owner, greg from my district shared this story with me. i want to share this with diane. i operate a small painting business and very happy with the cover tennessee program for small businesses and their employees. it had a small co-pay and covered up to $25,000 each year. it covered 12 doctors visits and annual physical at reasonable costs and this is being canceled effective january 2014 because it does not meet the requirements of obama care. this directly contradicts the comments made by president obama that we could keep our existing program. they had affordable health care that they liked but they didn't get to keep that. and i ask, is this right or is this just for this group of people. these 28,000 citizens of tennessee are now forced to find new coverage plans on the health care website there are people out t
hearing on stand your ground laws. itnesses include the mother of trayvon mar on the. you'll hear from supporters of the law that currently exist in one form or another in as many as 30 states h. is an hour and a alf. >> can i ask you all to please stand. it is customary to administer the oath before the subcommittee. will your testimony be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so hope you god? let the record reflect that the witnesses answered in the affirmative. each witness will be given five minutes for an opening statement. any written statement will be admitted without objection. our first witness is sabrina fulton. she is the mother of trayvon martin. her son was shot and killed at the age of 17 on the night of february 26, 2012 in sanford, florida. his parents have created a foundation to provide support and advocacy for the victims of violent crimes. she is a graduate of florida memorial university. thank you for coming here today. please proceed with your testimony. >> thank you so much for taking the time to listen to what i have to say and the rest of the p
it's only the federal government has an estimated 5000 or so criminal laws that have over criminalized this country. hopefully when i am here again for a hearing weekend fervently work toward eliminating or correcting the thousands of federal laws that have sometimes put people behind bars for things that most americans have no clue would be against the criminal law. so senators i humbly implore you let's leave state criminal law to the consideration of the state legislatures though we in congress will probably be well served to take advice from the states that are still solvent. thank you. >> thank you congressman gohmert and i want to thank your college scholars from the tear is in congressman fudge for their testimony as well. we appreciate your being here today and we are going to proceed to the second panel as you depart. thank you again. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> i'm sorry. if i can ask you all to please stand. it's customary to give the oath before this committee. if you please raise your right hand. view from the testimony you're about
. it attacks cost drivers like medical liability law that are making health care unaffordable. it restores pricing flexibility to plans so a healthy young person can again purchase catastrophic insurance for next to nothing. it takes the best of the american health care system, preserves it, and corrects its flaws. i realize the senate's likely to bury this reform as it has so many, but it's important that the house pass it so that the american people can see that there is still hope to save what was once the finest health care system in the world and can be again as soon as this favored dream of obamacare finally breaks. we have just been through a government shutdown because democrats refused even to consider delaying the obamacare train wreck. they got their way, and that train wreck is now upon us. i believe in the coming months the american people will recognize the urgent warnings that the republicans tried so desperately to convey. and they'll be looking for a way out. we need to blaze that trail now. for that reason i rise to ask the house leadership to bring the republican health
that these are just real americans committed to following the law and catching bad guys at the end of the day. it's important we get to the privacy issues that are important. i just wanted to ask this particular question. i dpsh some talk about a permanent advocate in the fisa court. i scratch my head a bit, and i can't find that anywhere else, and in a criminal grand jury, there's no advocate on behalf of the person they're seeking indictment; is that correct? >> that's correct. there's no advocate, and even when a witness goes in a grand jury, they don't go in and are not allowed to go in with an attorney, and in particular, probably the closest am ji is the acquisition of a wiretap for domestic criminal law enforcement, and that doesn't involve any sort of adversary process at all, but an ex parte process with the government or agent going in similar to the fisa process we have now. >> and by design, the court was supposed to be that adversary -- too strong a word -- but to check the compliance with the law and constitution; is that correct? >> correct. this is the constitutional protection th
go to law school, he's a lawyer. imagine a black person goes to elite law school, graduate from law school, and when that person goes for a job, let's say at an elite law firm for six to get a job with a distinguished judge, or seeks to get a job at any place selective. the person that's going to be assessing this candidate is going to mark down the candidate to some degree because of affirmative action. the person who is assessing the candidate knows that the school has affirmative action, and by the way, virtually every selective law school in the united states has affirmative action. so if you have a black person who has graduated, graduate from harvard law school or graduate from where he went to school, yale law school. they go to the fancy firm, sure, they've got a nice brownie points they went to this fancy law school, but what he has in mind is the person accessing the candidate will say, yes, this person has a nice halo of having gone to yale law school or harvard law school, but the person doing the assessment is going to dim that halo. the person is going to say, this per
for valid foreign intelligence purposes and we work within the law >> the response - america's spy chief explains why they gather intelligence on u.s. allies. >> i want to apologise to you that the website has not worked as well as it should >> admitting problems - the website that is supposed to let americans sign up for health care has republicans and democrats calming for delay. >> it's beautiful. >> helping survivors of sandy reclaim some of their precious belongings >> the ambitious project completed in turkey to expect two continents under water. -- to connect two continents under water. >> no apologies, no excuses from the top spy chiefs. the head of the national intelligence told house intelligence committee that phone taps on foreign citizens are not true. the nsa would rather take the beating in the media than give up a program protecting americans from terrorists. >> top chiefs say the agency did nothing illegal, and part of the problem is leaked documents. they reveal rare details of america's surveillance techniques. >> vigorously defending the job agencies do to keep americ
officers plan to treat sex offenders on halloween night. >> reporter: we will see law enforcement target a small number of sex offenders to get them off the street. but there's other areas that want to ban all sex offenders from participating on halloween and that effort has failed. we know of two things 2-year- old christopher likes to do that's to run and trick or treat. >> i love taking him trick or treating. candy she loves candy. >> reporter: his mother also looks forward to halloween and supports laws that stops sexual predators from participating such as putting out decorations or giving out candy. >> if you're on megan's law list don't bother. we don't want our kids around you. >> reporter: every year, parolees are banned from decorating or keeping porch lights lit on halloween night. but that only applies to parolees. the city of orange in southern california passed an ordnance to force all sex offenders to put a warning sign on their front door on halloween night. but a group called california reform sex offenders law fought them in court and won. we talked to that group
and discusses how it has shaped the copyright laws that we have today and this is about one hour. [applause] >> thank you so much. as the dean indicated, most of us and a large number of legal scholars, you might be surprised to learn that an area that is not compelled by law, something that is informal but very organized, and it has grown up to fill the various needs and the various cracks in the wall of law and i am going to be talking about one of those major cracks in the law today and i will be focused on the 19th century in the united states and particularly on authors and publishers in america, really from the 1820s and 30s amah up to lease the end of the century where, as you will see, the world is really kind of turned upside down where publishing is concerned. lawful piracy is still regarded as piracy and yet it was lawful. and uncopyrighted works well protected by an informal system of rights that were recognized by publishers and how could this be and the answer lies in some of these mysteries of informal norms that exist alongside the law and sometimes even in place of the law.
republican complaints the new health care law is forcing the cancellation of many existing insurance plans. hundreds of thousands of people who have purchased their own insurance have reportedly begun receiving notices that their plans will be canceled or changed because they no longer meet the loss coverage requirements. 26 palestiniand prisoners as part of the agreement that reopened u.s.- backed peace talks earlier this year. it is the second wave of the releases that will ultimately free 104 of the thousands of palestinians in israeli prisons. as jubilant crowds greeted the freed prisoners in the west bank and gaza, israel announced today it plans to construct 1500 new homes in an east jerusalem settlement. the u.s. brokered israeli- palestinian negotiations are continuing behind closed doors. in a statement ahead of the prisoner's, the top palestinian negotiator yasser abed rabbo said israel's current stance in the talks is its most hardline in over 20 years. he said israel is seeking to hold onto major parts of the occupied west bank, "undermining the possibility of establishing ,"so
of progression of slowly dismantling the campaign-finance laws, the foundation of those laws we got in the 1970's. citizens united is by far the biggest there. upcoming case will be another one, the listing rules for aris. and potentially some court watchers believe, he could not down the benefits given to candidates and parties themselves. so, the citizens united is the most high-profile decision on this issue, but very much in a string of cases and we do not know how this is going to and yet either. marianne from tennessee on our line for independents. good morning. caller: good morning. i have a question about dark money. when the representatives who are supposed to be representing us shut down the government over obamacare, the stock market went down. resumed, iternment went up the same day. since these representatives get a heads up on the market movements, how many of them made money, who were they, and how much? host: andy kroll. guest: that is a good question. that gives back to what the previous color said about the stock act. there is absolutely the for them to act on information they h
. there has been many debates on how to implement lawyer's law which consist of outpatient treatment. it was named after laura wilcox, a mental health worker who had been shot to death by a man who refused treatment. the county r remains the only county to implement the law. there have been other counties in los angeles county and other counties who are considering it. >> why have they not adopted the law. what is it about forced treatment and the consequences for an allowing refusing treatment. we have a panel who have a knowledge of this subject in some cases because of their professional endeavors and in some cases because of personal experiences and in some cases, both. let me introduce them. karen chen is an attorney manager for the san francisco public defenders office, kathy, whose son battled mental illness, can is a subject treatment expert for the medical center. danny is the associate director for the serial neeb breet program for the city of san diego. and san francisco chief of police. gary is a psychiatrist and laura's law advocate and eduardo vega of the mental health
this law work. they voted over 40 times to repeal the law. they shut down the government and threatened to force a default in order to stop it. they're rooting for failure. madam secretary, can you tell us what would be the impact on americans health insurance if republicans had been successful in their efforts to defund or repeal the affordable care act? >> well, i think that the estimates of the congressional budget office is that would have increased the deficit by about $110 billion in the first decade and close to a trillion dollars in the second decade. we know that we have 42 or 43 million americans without health insurance at all, some of them medicaid eligible and some over the medicaid eligibility. 30 governors so far, republicans and democrats, have declared their support for moving ahead with medicaid expansion, but absent that, the affordable care act, those folks would be without any kind of health security. and in the private market, what we know is it takes a real toll. but i'd say the biggest issue is not just the financial toll, not the community toll, not the country
be grandfathered in. >> she's lying because the grandfather clause for those plans, right in the law, had an old list of exceptions that made the grandfather clause meaningless. compare it with the grandfather clause for unions in the very next paragraph where there, that is guaranteed period, as the president said, without the long string of fine print to make it meaningless. stuart: got it. mr. waxman is on, getting political, go. >> he said tens of millions would lose their insurance, but in fact everybody in this country is going to have action cess to health insurance because they won't be discriminated against. they said that it would explode the deficit and yet the reputable organizations like the budget office says it's going to save 100 billion dollars over ten years. so we've had a litany of objections from the republicans about the affordable care act which has driven this to such a frenzy, they even closed the government. so, now, we have you before the committee and you're being asked, i suppose later you'll be asked about the website, but let me pursue this question about individua
americans who have to pay for their own health insurance now have to switch to fl comply with the law. we'll give the affordable healthcare act a checkup, who will have to change their plans and why, and how will it affect young healthy americans. the success depends on the young signing up in large numbers. >> on capitol hill today marilyn tavenar, the administrator for cms answered tough questions about the affordabl affordable . >> i want to assure you that it can and will be fixed, and we're working around the clock to deliver the shopping experience that you deserve. >> reporter: but new to the hearing, individuals receiving cancellation letters from their insurance providers. >> i would take them back to the free affordable care act days if you were in the market, half the individuals in the market did not stay on their policies, they were kicked off for pre-existing conditions. they saw their premiums go up 20% a year. now, in fact, the issuer has decided to change the plan didn't have to. plans were grandfathered in in 2010. if they didn't make significant changes in cost sharings
up in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight more. i never gate gave up my fate. my hope is restored. >> with that i would like to thank all of our panelist. thank you. [ applause ] and we are now going to move to our second panel. while they take their seats, this idea of forced treatment versus constitutional rights has always been a tension that we've had in our criminal justice system. there is an issue that came up earlier this year that you may have read about involving this implementation of a court that was supposed to treat individuals who were suffering from long-term alcoholism. and the court was set up in a way where individuals were not being arrested for a crime but instead were being jailed for contempt of court as long as 120-150 days in jail. my of
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
care law that i think is bad for patients as well as doctors and nurses to take care of them as well as the taxpayers this -- the problems with the bad side are only the tip of the expert. the law itself is fatally flawed in terms of keeping your doctor and all of these cancellations of policies. gerri: i will show some numbers. we have been running a tally on the cancellations. i have something. if you add up all these numbers from all over the country, hundreds of thousands of people getting cancellations. kathleen sebelius was saying that there not cancellations. if they are not, what are they? >> there cancellations, and there are more than some. more and more of these grand father plans will have to make enough changes to comply that there will be canceled, no longer legal for sale which is bad. >> the regulations they wrote after words. the tower of regulations. they've really got very restricted in the regulations when the president said if you like your insurance to keep it. really only if the white house likes your insurance you can keep their insurance. the white house is n
of cyber bullying and that is why i did a remarkable partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forw
they're in a union or not. mr. griffin has extensive experience in employment law. he's highly respected by his fellow labor lawyers on both the union and business sides. as general counsel for the nlrb he will safeguard fair compensation and working conditions for all american workers. this week the senate will also vote on a number of other crucial executive nominations. some of whom have been stalled for more than a year. the senate will consider the nomination of katherine archuleta to serve as director of the office of personnel management. that is an extremely important position. she started her career in public service as an elementty tri schoolteacher. she will be the agency's first hispanic director. this is what she said -- and i quote -- "you do it as public service because have you a deep passion for public good and civic engagement. that's her quote. she's working in both the transportation and energy departments under president clinton, she served as chief of staff to tib the the labor secretary hilda solis for three years. she is emintentsly qualified yet ms. arc
, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> thank you. >> tomorrow law enforcement will take part in operation boo. under state law patrolled sex offenders must follow special requirements on the night of halloween. they include a 5:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. curfew, no derkerations and no -- derkerations and no off -- decorations and no offering candy to children. you can find out if there are any sex offenders living in your neighborhood by visiting the megan's law website. we've put a link at ktvu.com under the hot topics tab. >>> a delta airlines flight headed to san francisco landed safely after making an emergency landing in a remote area of alaska this morning. the 767 departing from tokyo was headed to sfo when the plane experienced a loss in cabin pressure. according to the faa, the flight landed without incident at cold bay airport. cold bay is on the western edge of the alaska peninsula and has a population of 108. >>> a special state hearing on b.a.r.t. workers' safety is scheduled for november 7th. the hearing comes in the wakes of the deaths of chris shepherd and larry dane yells. they -- daniels
the health care law included a hardship exemption from the individual mandate. yet the administration has failed to finalize the application form for their hardship exemption, 3 1/2 years after we passed this law. as of today, can an individual apply for a hardship exemption from the individual mandate on healthcare.gov. yes or no? >> i don't know. >> i do, it's no. on october 15, politico reported that if the online system for getting into obamacare coverage is rickety, the system for getting out of the mandate doesn't even exist yet. h.h.s. says it will take another month at least for the administration to finalize the forms for the hardship exemption from the individual mandate. why has it taken 3 1/2 years to finalize a simple application form for an exemption from an individual mandate? >> as you know the individual mandate is not in place until next year. we have made it very clear that if somebody is medicaid eligible in a state that doesn't choose -- >> my last question, an estimated 16 million people in the individual market have or will receive cancellation notices stating their
to my questions. you know the health care law included a hardship exemption from the individual mandate. yet the administration has failed to finalize the application form for the hardship exemption three and one-half years after we passed this law. as of today, can an individual apply for a hardship exemption from the individual mandate on healthcare.gov, yes or no? >> i don't know. >> i do, it's no. on october 15th, politico reported that if the online system for getting into obama care coverage is rickety, the system for getting out of the mandate doesn't even exist yet. hhs says it will take another month at least for the administration to finalize the forms for the hardship exemption from the individual mandate. why has it taken three and one-half years to finalize a simple application form for an exemption from the individual mandate? >> well, sir, as you know the individual mandate is not in place until next year. we have made it very clear that if somebody is medicaid eligible in a state that doesn't choose -- >> my last question an my last second. an estimated 16 million people
. the ntsb has tried to fix the problem. >> ntc for years has advocated for a change in state law that would require any car once it leaves the lot to actually have a license plate. >> reporter: but so far, they have had no success in sacramento. >> those folks that are using the toll bridges and not paying for that crossing put a greater on us who do pay our tolls. >> reporter: tonight i checked with the ntc and they said anyone who is caught violating the tolls and going through without a plate faces fines of $25 and up. they plan to continue working with the legislator to try and change the laws. reporting live in oakland, jana katsuyama, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> more details now the ntc wants the legislature to require all vehicles to have either a permanent plate or a temporary numbered plate at all times. one proposal would be to require dealer to print and install temporary paper plates before a car leaves the lot. the number would then be entered into the dmv data base. >>> new at 10:00, oakland police are investigating a shooting at the value inn hotel at west mcarthur boulevard. it
to discontinue the plans that people had when the law was passed, yes or no? >> not when the law was passed. no, sir. that's the grandfather clause. >> that's because the plans existed prior to passage of the law are grandfathered in as you have said? >> that's correct. >> so if an insurance company is no longer offering a certain plan, that's because that insurance company made a decision to change their policies and that caused them to take away the grandfather status from their insurance purchasers, is that right? >> that's correct. >> now, madame secretary. i want you to submit for the record a statement of what it is we can do about insurance companies that run around canceling the policies of their people and i don't have time to get the answer but i want to get a very clear statement from you as to what you can do so we can take some skin off some folks that have it coming. madame secretary, it's my understanding that these decisions of a business character are most common in the individual insurance market and that much turnover already exists and existed prior to the enactment of the l
of that law were found unconstitutional. one third of clinics were set to close their doors when the law would have gone into effect. one provision required doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges of a hospital within 30 miles of that abortion facility. federal district judge wrote the admitting privileges provision of house bill 2 does not bear a rational relationship to the legitimate right of the state in preserving and promoting fetal life or a woman's health and in any event places a substantial obstacle in the path of a woman seeking an abortion of a non-viable fetus and is thus an undue burden to her. the judge struck down some of the law's restriks on the use of pills used to induce apportion. wendy davis issued this warning during her filibuster of the bill. >> i'd say if you vote for this bill you're simply happy to ignore medical science and watch women and children die for no reason. >> texas families are stronger and healthier when women across the state have access to quality health care. i would rather see our tax dollars spent on improving our kids' schools ra
. that is why allowing insurers to continue offering deficient plans next year is such a bad policy. the law says that all plans except those that were grandfathered in 2010, must meet the new consumer protection standards. if we don't enforce this policy, insurance companies can continue offering flimsy coverage that disappears when people actually need it and no one should want that. it is understandable that there will be a focus today on what isn't working, but we must also remember what is working. the health insurance plans that are being offered in the exchanges are good plans. the premiums are much lower than expected. 60% of the uninsured individuals shopping in the new marketplaces will be able to get coverage for less than $100 per month. half of the young adults will be able to get coverage for less than $50 per month. and since congress adopted the affordable care act, health care costs across the whole economy have grown at their lowest level in decades. the success of the affordable care act is due to the efforts of many people, but one individual more than any other is respon
the health care law. >> if you like your health care plan, you keep your health care plan. these folks need to stop scaring everybody. if you like your health care plan, you keep your health care plan. nobody's going to force you to leave your health care plan. if you like your doctor, you keep seeing your doctor. i don't want government bureaucrats meddling in your health care. but the point is i don't want insurance company bureaucrats meddling in your health care either. if you like your private health insurance plan, you can keep it. if you're one of more than the 250 million americans who already have health insurance, you will keep your health insurance. >> well, now, that promise is proving impossible to keep and we're hearing from people who buy their insurance on the individual market like self-employed realtor debra who recently got a notice from her insurer saying her policy will no longer be offered because of the new requirements in the law. >> all i want is what i currently have. i want to keep my doctors, and i would like to have lower premiums. >> the health care law require
clearly, there is a demand. we need to get information to people about the law. this is the law, this is not any longer a debate. it was a law passed by both houses of congress, signed by the president of the united states, upheld by the supreme court. the president was reelected. it is the law. and people have benefits and rights under that law, and we've got to get that information so they can make good choices for themselves and their families. >> well, thank you. it is the law, and, frankly, i find it disconcerting that my republican colleagues have done nothing but root for this law to fail for the last three and a half years. and now there's a big show here of being upset at problems with the website and keeping people from signing up for coverage fast enough. so i would just say to my colleagues on the other side of the aisle, you're really on the wrong side of history here. the website will be fixed and millions of americans will be able to get quality affordable health insurance coverage through the affordable care act. and again, i thank you for being here today, madam
moment dozens of senate republicans are expected to vote against a gay rights law that would ban discrimination against gay and lesbian employees in the workplace. that's 39 republicans who didn't get the memo. why? because they haven't learned anything. what about women's rights? republican senator lindsey graham is now launching a new fight against a woman's right to choose. calling for a 20-week abortion ban. >> i've been a pro-life member of congress since day one. i'm proud to lead this charge. >> todd akin was once proud to lead this charge. how'd that work out? again, they haven't learned anything. and this extreme ideology is particularly bad. look at virginia. the republican candidate for governor ken cuccinelli is as far right as they come. he thinks same-sex relationships are immoral, wants to ban abortions with no exception, and once said it's possible the president was born in kenya. and he's plunging in the polls. 12 points behind. so why is that? president obama was in virginia over the weekend with the answer. >> you've seen on extreme faction of the republican pa
many small contributors. it represents a big change to depression-era laws designed to protect small investors from risky investments. special correspondent carl woy h worthy has our story. >> reporter: he's trying to raise money for his start-up company. it's called juicy canvas, an on-line business that allows users to customize original artwork, to make prints, sheet cases or mobile equipment. it's an idea he thinks could be huge, so he's doing what most start-ups do at this stage, trying to sell his idea to big investors, venture capitalists. but competing for their money is a time-consuming and difficult process. it takes face-to-face meetings, networking and luck to hook in an investor with big bucks. >> there is only so much they're going to invest per year, and every hour, there is exponentially more and more and more start-ups getting into the market, so it's going to be harder for us to kind of bubble up. >> overall new businesses account for -- >> reporter: but now start-up businesses could soon have another form of cash. >> for start-up businesses, this bill is a potentia
which he fought for so long in the justice. the decision was law of the land. equal justice under law. >> when a supreme court decided the gideon case, they really brought light to that phrase. it doesn't matter if you are rich, it doesn't matter if you are poor, you get the same equal chance. >> just look at what happened to gideon. the supreme court didn't set gideon free but it gave him a fair trial with a competent attorney. >> not guilty. >> clarence earl gideon was a free man. the man who won a landmark supreme court case went to live a normal living with a job pumping gas. >> when i read where it says equal justice under law, i'm very inspired by that. i'm very comforted by that. but i know a lot of people are treated unfairly. i see it as something encouraging but i don't see it yet. >> it's written into constitution and established into the goal for society to reach for and live up to. people will fall short, rights can be ignored or even trampled. with nothing more than a pencil and knowledge. >> if you know your rights you can protect your rights. if you don't know your r
emerging to watch, she's also graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime yet he was still convicted based on the false testimony of a single neighbor. he was sentence to life behind bars. in prison mr. colwell contacted the center for help and located two witnesses who saw the murder and said mr. colwell was not involved in anyway. they located the re
a journalist is not something i appreciate we have laws that model the region have positive things in their place and as long as the internet is not shut down one reason i am concerned about privacy is i want people to trust online communication or find things out without being watched all the time. people can now be there are a journalist in many ways they can enter one of those the most interesting about politics of the mideast because they could have a block or get an audience i dunno if you are familiar but there are plenty of people who are stuck give the scholarly mode retracts nobody would reid but now they could find a mass audience there is a lot of debate on the internet the things you were talking about for instance, the chelsea manning. he lives a few blocks from me but rinaldi is seen as a hero. and it to have 500 students who had never heard of them but into a three hours they could learn a great deal in know more about the break-in of his psychiatrist office what the government did. i don't like to get baum doubt that we lost hour old mechanisms. i am understand. tel
marketplace before the affordable care act became law? >> i would say it wasn't a mark marketplace at all. it was unprotected, unregulated, and people were really on their own. >> madam secretary, the kaiser family foundation reports have over 50% turnout of individuals that have coverage and individual market churn out coverage every year. they either lose coverage, priced out or drop it s that consistent with what you're aware snf. >> that's an accurate snapshot. about a third of the people are in for about six months. and over half are in for a year or less. >> so individuals that were in the individual marketplace before the passage of the affordable care act did not have the same protections as those in group coverage? >> that's true. >> and would those individuals in the individual marketplace sometimes have higher co-pays? >> higher co-pays, unlimited out of pocket costs for often coverage that was medically underwritten or excluded whatever medical condition they had in the first place. >> so these were typically one-year contracts. if they use the plan because they got sick nor a
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